Family problems can sometimes inevitable. But this has to be resolved as soon as possible for it may affect children at home too.

The following are some points you might consider, as Dr. Joan Freeman, a child psychologist, suggested:

  • Be clear in what you are directing the children to do and how you feel about it. Does “behave yourself” really mean “be quiet?” If it’s quiet you’re after, they say so, and say why.
  • Each parent should avoid giving instructions that contradict the other’s; it confuses a child and makes him anxious, so try to be consistent.
  • Respect your child’s integrity; trust him to mean well.
  • Keep the atmosphere at home as tension-free as you can, for example by keeping parental arguments out of children’s hearing.
  • Reassure the child of his rightful place in the family, and that you love him, whatever. Tell him this in words of one syllable.
  • When you’re wrong, admit it. Your saving face is always less important that child’s feelings, and what he’s learning from you about life.