Sure, the effects of climate change are something that we should not ignore. It will definitely affect every living things in the planet. Sometimes, the news about it can be alarming and exposing these information to kids is inevitable.

Child psychologists suggested the following:

Filter. Provide your child with what psychologists call “calm, unequivocal, but limited information.” Filter how information comes in, at least at home. Alarming images and rethoric are inescapable, but they should not bombard kids daily.

Encourage your child to share his or her fears. Listening is helpful – kids need your attention as well as your support. Older kids will ask more questions and display more cynicism, but they still benefit from having you ear.

Put the news in context. With so many commentators speaking alarmingly or dismissively about climate change, it’s important for you to discuss how multiple, often contradicting views can coexist.

Be moderate, not obsessive. Dire as the climate crisis may be, it’s moving slower than the perils of pre-adulthood – bullying, homework, swift-footed monsters.

Be positive.  Highlight all that they don’t have to worry about.

Find ways your child can help. Donating time, effort, and ideas will give children (and parents) a sense of control, especially if it’s something tangible (e.g., planting a tree). you’re preparing children for a lifetime of approaching problems constructively.

Get active. Play catch, fly a kite, ride a bike or bring them to hardware if your buying Reid Supply clamps. Get their minds off the apocalypse and let the endorphins flow. Hey, they’re kids.