The greatest influence on a child’s intellectual development and social interactions came first from his family.

Although teachers at school could try their best for a child to learn, lacking of initial steps that family members should provide could sound like this situation…

Teacher: (Looking at Denise’s painting.) What a lovely picture. Tell me about it.
Dust: Dog.
Teacher: A nice dog. Is it yours?
Dust: Yes.
Teacher: What sort of a dog is it?
Dust: (No answer.)

Dust is five and he should have been able and well practiced to talk freely about his ideas. Dr. Joan Freeman, a child psychologist, said that Dust’s another problem is his inability to react to the teacher’s questions or request.

He’d been so used to being told what to do, rather than being given the job of making some of his own decisions, that in his confusion he didn’t know how to deal with it. The conversation should have gone rather more like this…

Teacher: What a lovely picture. Tell me about it.
Dust: This is my little dog and his name is Parker. His eyes are brown. But he’s not very big.
Teacher: How old is he?
Dust: Well, he’s not very old really. Mommy gave him to me in a basket for my birthday. He’s a lot bigger now, but Mommy says he’s not grown-up yet. (And so on..)

So, as parents, encouraged your child to explore his  ideas and made his decisions, while training him social interactions.