There have been quite a lot of researches on the actual effects on young children of a working mother.

Some would say that a stay at home mom do bring up normal happy children but if unwilling, she can suffer from depression and frustration.

But is it really worth it to work outside home?

Dr. George Brown in London thus found out on his research:

* The children of working mothers did not often feel abandoned and unwanted, but were more likely to gain in feelings of independence and respect, with an enriched lifestyle, seeing their mothers as independent rather than dependent women.

* There does not seem to be any evidence of problems for the children to caused specifically by their mothers’ outside work.

* The real problems in the lives of young children with working mothers occur when the mothers are working because they are poor—it’s the effects of the poverty, not the work itself, that cause the problems.
However, above all these, the constant presence of a mother for the first five years of a child’s life is very vital for his well-being. Every member of a family could share in making sure that the baby gets all he needs in plenty of one to one contact.

Things to consider (according to Dr. Joan Freeman):

* Keep your family to the size and spacing that you can afford, both emotionally and financially.

* Get close to your baby right from the beginning—or at least try. It can sometimes take a while for feelings to develop.

* Be “parents” and not only friends to your children. They need some structure in their lives, and to know that they can depend on you.

* Priorities often have to change when you have children.

* Whether the mother works outside the home or not, the choice must be made by the couple together. Be as open and honest in your discussions as you can, or the underlying resentment in either parent can make family life less than pleasant.

* Constant absence from children by either parent is not good for their healthy balanced development. If your work is all-demanding, you may have to choose between cutting it down somewhat or bringing up your children in what may be in reality a one-parent (or almost a no-parent) family.